After a fun-filled weekend at TRNSMT 2019, it was time to sit down and weigh up the pros and cons of the weekend; in particular, the issue of the newly-introduced Queen Tut’s stage.

Created in essence to combat the lack of gender diversity in festivals, the organisers had the right ideas in mind when it came to this extra stage.

However, in practice, there were a few things to be improved on for next year’s festival.

The location of the stage is a mystery to not only festival-goers, but some of the stewards as well. Located in a hideaway corner of the green near the Smirnoff Bar, it felt almost like a hidden secret to unlock.

The acts that played over the weekend included the likes of: Cara Rose, Lauren Spiteri, Zoe Graham and The Eves. In my opinion, one of the more positive things about this stage is the exposure that Queen Tuts gives to smaller female-centric artists. I had never heard of the majority of these artists before the festival but I found new loves in the forms of Edinburgh duo The Eves.

The stage was similar in layout to the original King Tut’s stage, with the addition of some seating in order to give it a more relaxed vibe in comparison to the other stages at TRNSMT. However, this layout made it difficult for crowds to form at the stage and boogie to the artists.

On TRNSMT’s official website they state

“The Queen Tut’s Stage is a very important addition to TRNSMT Festival. As a company, we are committed to helping to close the gender play gap and at TRNSMT specifically, we have focussed on providing a platform for core female acts at a grassroots level to help them become the bill toppers of the future. Of course, as an industry, we have a long way to go but we feel this is a real step in the right direction.”

The festival also collaborated with SWIM, who are a Scottish female network of musicians and industry professionals committed to gaining equal opportunities for women.

Representatives from SWIM, which stands for Scottish Women Inventing Music, were on hand at TRNSMT to spread their message and ask people to donate to help them continue their important work.

The mix of music that these artists brought to the Queen Tut’s stage is another huge positive for the festival in general. From soulful folk artist Tamzene to rough grunge band CRYSTAL, the stage has it all in terms of style and diversity of music.

So overall, the move that TRNSMT made with Queen Tut’s was smart and a good choice, and can only be improved upon for next year’s festival which takes place from Friday 10thJuly till Sunday 12thJuly. 

To find out more about the festival and the community of SWIM, read more here:

https://trnsmtfest.com/news-post/trnsmt-2020-early-bird-tickets
https://www.scottishwomeninventingmusic.com/fullmission