women

To celebrate International Women’s Day, we decided to highlight some of the women on the platform. You may know them for their writing or presenting, but the stories and journeys of these women are just as important. It is a pleasure to work with these people and to have seen the growth in their abilities. Without further ado, let’s get to know some of the women of IndustryMe.

Dani Akparanta

women

Location: Camden, London

Occupation: Presenter

What inspired you to be a Presenter?

I have always been good with speaking and understanding people in general. So, one day in college I was a part of an anti-bullying project we had done visiting Sky News and I was one of the hosts presenting it. I received a lot of positive feedback from my dad and teacher at the time. It pushed me to want to discover my potential to the fullest and that’s where it all began. 

Have you faced any challenges in getting into this industry?

Ahh, there is a lot I could mention but one is doing everything myself. As much as it is amazing to be able to do everything yourself, it is hard to multitask everything and bring your visions to life all at the same time. 

I thank God for whiteboards because it has helped me learn to be organised and complete things one step at a time. The other is meeting some amazing people that have helped me on this journey as a Presenter, so If help is needed I got it.

Who are some of the women in life or in the industry who have inspired you?

My mother is one person who inspires me. She always pushed me to not be afraid to be myself and to never change, and I stuck to that. I grow and stay true to myself always.

Which is your most proud presenting moment?

This is hard to answer as I have so many. But, I feel one of them was being able to host open mic nights for IndustryMe. They gave me a chance to show everyone what I could do and once I took to that stage holding the mic that was it. I didn’t look back after that and loved every single time I have done it. Hopefully, I do more hosting like this year.

Which is your favourite album of all time?

This is exactly why I don’t have a favourite anything haha because I am so indecisive. But I can say one of the many albums of all time that I love is Wizkid’s ‘Made in Lagos‘ (Deluxe Edition).

Wizkid has been consistent for 10+ years and never fails to show us exactly why he is on his game always. This album is a vibe and the features on it made it a solid deal. I’m always repeating songs in this album and listening to it so it’s one for me.

What are your goals as a Presenter?

I don’t want to say too much as I will be showing that this year however, one of my goals as a presenter is to bring something different to the table. I want those who I speak with to feel like this is their safe space, that they can bring everyone into their world, on their journey, and learn something new with them as they grow over time.

Esme Watson

women

Location: Nuneaton, Warwickshire

Occupation: Music Journalist

What inspired you to be a Music Journalist?

My main inspiration to become a journalist was the first time I ever watched Almost Famous. My dad has the biggest film collection anyone has ever seen, and he often gives me films that he thinks I’ll like. When I was 15, he handed me a collection of three films and told me to put on the last disc. As soon as it started it was like everything I wanted to do had just fallen into place. I was watching a 15-year-old, just like me, on tour with a band. Without a doubt, it has been the only thing I’ve wanted to do since that point. As a result of growing up in a very creative household, I’ve always been drawn to music and writing.

Have you faced any challenges in getting into this industry?

As I have only recently started to get more opportunities, I think the biggest challenge I had to face was figuring out exactly how I wanted to pursue my dream. Firstly, I started at college on a Journalism course and loved being right in the middle of it all. I couldn’t help but worry that I hadn’t looked anywhere else and I changed to a film studies course. Honestly, I loved this because I got to pick the films we watched every Friday and argued with my classmates about Taxi Driver. Nevertheless, I still wonder what else I could have learnt from sticking to the course I originally chose.

Who are some of the women in life or in the industry who have inspired you?

I have many different inspirations in my life, as do most, but as for the women in my life, my mum has always been a big part of encouraging me to be as creative as possible. Like I said, our house has always been full of music and art all over the walls. I have been allowed to try out every outlet of expression. Likewise, some other inspirations have been writers like Patti Smith and Orion Carloto. Although not strictly music journalists, both of these women have used their artistry to speak their truth and have given platforms to so many upcoming women writers. Of course, I can’t forget about Joni Mitchell or boygenius.

Which article are you most proud of writing?

I truly am proud of everything I write but the piece that sticks out to me is my ‘The Black Women Who Made Waves in Hip-Hop‘ article. Due to this being one of my first opportunities to write an opinion piece, I fell in love with the research and writing style that came with it. Fortunately, I got a lot of great feedback from this one and it cemented just why I want to be a writer. Another one would have to be my ‘Free Woman: Joni Mitchell’s Court And Spark (50 Year Anniversary)’. This was such a special feature for me as Joni is one of my biggest inspirations. I love her so much and sharing her stories felt like a real honour.

Which is your favourite album of all time?

This is such a big question and it’s one I’m always so stuck on. I tend to just associate different albums to different parts of my life, so it is ever-changing. However, one that has always stuck is ‘Flower Boy’ by Tyler, The Creator. I listened to this and ‘Isolation‘ by Kali Uchis on repeat for a solid two years. Ultimately, it’s encapsulating Tyler as an artist and everything that his art brings, showing every side of him, and the experimental sound he has now perfected. To me, it’s always felt like listening to the innermost workings while he finds a new side to himself and his music. Some honourable mentions would be Clairo’s ‘Sling’, Mac Miller’s ‘Swimming’, and ‘Rumours’ by Fleetwood Mac.

What are your goals as a Music Journalist?

My main goal as a music journalist is to carry on the understanding of how a piece of music can completely shift everything in your life. As well, as allowing people to speak out about how art has affected their lives in different ways. It is undeniably one of life’s greatest experiences. I could listen to the same album as anyone else but we’d both hear it differently; I think that’s what it’s all about. Writing for CREEM magazine is something that would top it all off, it would be such a full-circle moment to write for the magazine that started it all for William in Almost Famous.

Kloe Paton

women

Location: Moray, North East Scotland

Occupation: Music Journalist

What inspired you to be a Music Journalist?

I come from a family of (now retired) musicians, so music was an integral part of my upbringing and has remained so in my adult life. I’ve always loved storytelling and have conjured up my own little stories since I was old enough to write. Music journalism combines my two passions!

Have you faced any challenges in getting into this industry?

It’s hard when you’re young and your experience is so limited. Securing opportunities isn’t easy, especially as it is such a competitive industry. Journalism and Publishing remain very male-dominated landscapes, and although there are great initiatives to mitigate that by certain big firms – women still face major barriers to entry.

Which article are you most proud of writing?

I am really proud of my recent Janelle Monáe piece for LGBTQIA+ History Month and Black History Month. That piece radiates joy, passion, and creativity. That’s what music and art are all about.

Which is your favourite album of all time?

Easy! ‘The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill‘. It changed my life.

What are your goals as a Music Journalist?

I would love to be given more responsibility in my current role, continue to write quality pieces, and be given even more free rein to cover what I think people want to read. I see my writing portfolio growing week on week, and it’s really gratifying.

Bethan Eyre

bethan

Location: Hertford, Hertfordshire

Occupation: Music Journalist/PR

What inspired you to be a Music Journalist/get into PR?

First and foremost, it was my love for music, and eagerness to collaborate with creative people which inspired me to pursue a career in the music industry. In terms of getting into music journalism, I saw it as the perfect opportunity to elevate the voices of new, emerging talents whom I felt passionately about. Through doing so I learnt valuable lessons about the inner workings of the industry, and became immersed in a scene I felt energised by. Similarly with music PR, I felt inspired by the prospect of working closely with new artists and being able to contribute to their artist development.

Have you faced any challenges in getting into this industry?

Gaining experience within such a connections-based industry can be really difficult. I struggled to find an in that didn’t require you to already have a load of experience. This is where music journalism became so valuable in the process. Having an interest in music and enjoyment for articulating it, I was able to gain significant experience and slowly start building up a network of contacts. I also learnt that you must be prepared to put yourself out there and take any opportunity that comes your way.

Who are some of the women in life or in the industry who have inspired you?

Annie Mac is without a doubt such an inspirational force in the music industry. From her days at BBC Radio 1 to her infamous DJ sets, she instilled a sense of excitement about the discovery and celebration of new music in me from a young age. Annie has always been a great advocate and spokesperson for gender equality in the music industry and used her profile to uplift others and give insight into her experiences with misogyny in the industry. This is an admirable quality to have and contributes to her ongoing service to the UK music scene, which has earnt her a tastemaker reputation.

Which is your most proud moment in PR?

Without saying too much, there is a feature coming out later this month, with an artist myself and the team at Whiteboard PR have been working with, which I am very excited about! It was a proud moment in my career to have been involved in the process of this project, working alongside the magazine’s producer, editorial team, stylist, and photographer to create a piece that’ll contribute positively to the artist’s profile.

Which is your favourite album of all time?

This an impossible question to answer, but if I had to choose just one, it would be Loyle Carner’s 2019 album ‘Not Waving, But Drowning’. In all its poetic beauty, it’s a body of work I can endlessly listen to and never tire of.

What are your goals in Music Journalism/PR?

Over the next year, I hope to interview some buzzy new acts, and expand my writing across new publications, maybe even reviving my old blog that I formed before starting with IndustryMe! In terms of PR, eventually, I’d love to build my own roster of artists whose development I feel really passionately about and help build their profile over time.

Find more articles celebrating International Women’s Day here.

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